Mental health is just as important as physical health to a child's well-being.

Mental health is just as important as physical health to a child's well-being.

How do I know when to worry about my child’s mental health?

As the person who cares for your child, you usually know your child better than anyone else. As your child develops and grows, they may have problems from time to time. If your child is acting unusual or seems to have a lot of distress for a long period of time, it may be time to get help. Other times to worry are when your child is showing highly unusual behavior that is causing them or others harm. A good question to ask is, “Are my child’s problems getting in the way of his or her day-to-day functioning?” Also ask yourself, “Is my child having problems with eating, sleeping, concentrating, or doing his or her usual tasks such as social activities, school and family relationships?”

All children have trouble from time to time. It is normal for children to have times when they are sad, angry, frustrated, and act shy or show anxiety– especially when faced with new situations. But, when your child is often distressed, cannot be soothed or comforted or is having problems that seem to be getting worse, it is a good idea not to worry alone. Just like your child’s physical health, there is a certain time when you may need to get a professional’s help. Also, if you are feeling overly concerned, have questions, or think that your child needs help or support, it is probably time to reach out to a qualified professional.

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Visit our Evidence-Based Practice Directory

KidsMentalHealthInfo.com has an evidence-based practice directory that lists mental health providers trained in popular evidence-based practices available in Connecticut for children and families with behavioral health needs. Evidence-based practices are those supported by research showing that they work for most children.