Mental health is just as important as physical health to a child's well-being.

Mental health is just as important as physical health to a child's well-being.

How to Get the Best Help

It is a good idea not to worry alone. Your pediatrician is often a good place to start. Your pediatrician can help you decide if you need more help. You may be reassured to know that some of your concerns are typical issues for your child’s developmental age and phase. In some cases, your pediatrician might recommend a further consultation or refer you to a qualified child mental health professional. If your pediatrician is not able to help, you can seek a consultation through a local child mental health provider or community agency.

There are other places you can get help as well. Talking to your school counselor or school psychologist can be a place to start. Some families find it helpful to talk to their minister. Many families have found it helpful to talk to other families about their experience. You can find support from other families by contacting a local family advocacy organization. However, if your child has a significant emotional, mental or behavioral health concern, it is best that you seek help from a qualified child mental health professional.

It can be hard to know where to start and what questions to ask. For more information on questions to ask when seeking help from a professional click here.

To better understand what to expect in your first consultation and following meetings, click here. We will walk you through what a typical consultation and evaluation might look like as well as share with you some key parts in child mental health treatment.

To find a qualified mental health professional, you can talk with your private insurance company who can give you a list of preferred providers in your area. If you live in CT and have HUSKY, you can ask the Behavioral Health Partnership (BHP) to help you find a provider or you can call 2-1-1 or visit Connecticut’s Network of Care website.

To access children’s mobile crisis intervention services in Connecticut call 2-1-1 or visit the website by clicking here.

April is World Autism Month

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a general term for disorders of brain development characterized by a range of symptoms. ASD is characterized by many different symptoms, the most common being difficulties with social interaction, difficulties with verbal and nonverbal communication, and repetitive behaviors. The degrees to which a child on the spectrum will experience each difficulty can vary greatly. There are no medical tests to diagnose Autism. Instead, physicians and psychologists administer behavioral evaluations. Treatments can include both behavioral treatments and medicines, with professional teams working closely with the child and their family. Recognizing the early signs of Autism can lead to earlier intervention, resulting in better outcomes. To access resources related to Autism, please click here. You can also visit www.kidsmentalhealthinfo.com and search for “Autism” in our resources database.