Mental health is just as important as physical health to a child's well-being.

Mental health is just as important as physical health to a child's well-being.

Child Trauma FAQs

What is Childhood Trauma?

Trauma occurs when a child experiences an intense event that threatens or causes harm to his or her emotional and physical well-being. Some events are more likely to be traumatic than others and people can have very different responses to the same even …

[read more]
What are some reactions that my child may have after experiencing a traumatic event?

When children experience a traumatic event, they may react in both a psychological and physical way. Their heart rate may increase, and they may begin to sweat, to feel agitated, to feel “butterflies” in their stomach, and to become emotionally upset. …

[read more]
How can I help my child deal with his/her reaction to a traumatic event?

If you are concerned about your child, it is best if you consult a qualified mental health specialist who has been trained to work with traumatic stress reactions. If left untreated, traumatic stress reactions can develop into more serious problems. To …

[read more]
When should I worry about my child’s reaction to a traumatic event?

It is important to understand that most children will likely develop some stress reactions if they have been the victim of a traumatic experience. In many cases, some acute reactions are normal for a child in the aftermath of a recent traumatic event. …

[read more]
What are the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children?

Symptoms of PTSD in children (also referred to more broadly as “childhood traumatic stress”) typically fall into four major categories: Traumatic Repetitions Traumatic play Play reenactment Nightmares Flashbacks and dissociation Distressed when reminde …

[read more]
What questions should I ask my doctor?

It is important to talk with your primary care doctor about your child’s symptoms to help you determine if your child’s symptoms are unusual or worrisome and if you should seek help. You can ask your pediatrician for a referral to a mental health speci …

[read more]
What is a Trauma Screening or Assessment?

A child’s primary care doctor can conduct a short trauma history for the child, or your child can be screened directly by a mental health specialist. Screenings are completed by the parent or caregiver for children ages 3-18.  If your child is age 7 or …

[read more]
Do I have to get help for my child who shows signs and symptoms of traumatic stress?

In some cases child traumatic stress symptoms may or may not meet the criteria for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Children can show their PTSD symptoms differently than adults. These PTSD symptoms in children will vary by the child’s age and de …

[read more]
What are some effective treatments available to help my child with traumatic stress?

Treatments that research shows can reduce child traumatic stress are called “evidence-based treatments”. There are many evidence-based treatments available in many states through qualified mental health professionals and agencies. Please click here to …

[read more]
Where can a parent/caregiver get support or help dealing with child traumatic stress?

There are many resources both nationally and locally (CT) to help parents and caregivers cope and find treatment for childhood traumatic stress. One great resource is called Get Help Now, sponsored by The National Child Stress Network. This website giv …

[read more]
Do young children remember traumatic events?

Trauma refers to an overwhelming, unanticipated danger or event that cannot be mediated or processed by the individual. Traumatic events are a direct threat to a person’s wellbeing. When confronted with trauma, a child may not have the ability to cope …

[read more]

Visit our Evidence-Based Practice Directory

KidsMentalHealthInfo.com has an evidence-based practice directory that lists mental health providers trained in popular evidence-based practices available in Connecticut for children and families with behavioral health needs. Evidence-based practices are those supported by research showing that they work for most children.