Mental health is just as important as physical health to a child's well-being.

Mental health is just as important as physical health to a child's well-being.

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Connecticut’s Evidence-Based Practice Directory, click here

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Child Development Infoline: 800-505-7000

Healthy From Day One

 


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66 results found

How do I get support for myself?
Parents and caregivers often say that talking to other parents is one of the most useful forms of support. Connecticut has many family advocacy and support centers where trained parents can assist you and link you to local resources. A link to these servi...

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How do I know if my child needs help right away?
If your child is in crisis and is at risk for hurting himself or others, you should get help right away by calling 911 or get help through the 211 Infoline and ask for emergency mobile psychiatric services (EMPS). EMPS works across the state of Connecticu...

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How do I know when to worry about my child’s mental health?
As the person who cares for your child, you usually know your child better than anyone else. As your child develops and grows, they may have problems from time to time. If your child is acting unusual or seems to have a lot of distress for a long period ...

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How do I talk to my child about this?
It is important for parents to be honest and use words your children can understand. A good place to start is by asking your child to talk about what is worrying them or bothering them. It is important to create a safe place where your child can talk with...

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How do I talk to the rest of the family about my child’s issues?
If you talk to your child's brothers and sisters, use words that are right for their age and that they can understand. Be careful not to burden your other children with too much information, but respect their questions and concerns. In some cases, sibli...

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How does my child’s gender impact mental health issues?
Both boys and girls can have mental health concerns and sometimes these issues show themselves in different ways. The way in which mental health issues develop depend on many things, but the child’s gender can have a role. Because boys and girls are of...

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How is an IEP different from a 504 plan?
A 504 plan, which falls under civil-rights law, is a plan to allow students with disabilities to participate freely and safely in school to get the same opportunities as everyone else. An IEP, which falls under the Individuals with Disabilities Education ...

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How is progress measured in the IEP?
The IEP must include a statement of how the child’s progress will be measured. An explanation of how parents will be given information of that progress should be included in the IEP. These progress reports must be given to parents at least as often as ...

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How will a doctor or mental health provider be able to identify my young child’s mental health concerns?
When you meet with your pediatrician or doctor, he/she is going to try to understand your concerns. Your doctor will ask you questions about your child’s symptoms, when they occur and under what circumstances. In order to get more detailed information y...

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How will mental health problems affect my child in school?
How your child acts at school may or may not be affected by his/her mental health issue. It depends upon the type of issue. Many times, it is helpful to talk with your child’s school counselor or social worker (or other school-based mental health staff)...

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